Notes

1. Church and Sunday School are the terms used by the majority Christian religious communities in the United States. I will use those terms for convenience. Other religious groups use different terms that refer to similar practices. Jewish families often belong to a synagogue or temple, for example, and their children may spend Saturdays going to Hebrew School.

2. From a study conducted by W. Bradford Wilcox, reported by PBS on October 19, 2005, in its Religion and Ethics Newsweekly. The analysis is available at www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/week908/analysis1.html. Table 1, which includes the relevant findings, is available at www.pbs.org/ wnet/religionandethics/week908/Wilcox_Data.pdf. Both accessed May 20, 2008.

3. Roccas, S., and M. B. Brewer, (2002). Social identity complexity. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 6, 88-106.

4. Sherif, Muzafer, O. J. Harvey, B. Jack White, William R. Hood, Carolyn W. Sherif (1954/1961), Intergroup Conflict and Cooperation: The Robbers Cave Experiment. Available online here: http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/ Sherif/index.htm. Accessed April 13,2008.

5. Gaertner, S. L., J. F. Dovidio, P. A. Anastasio, B. A. Bachman, and M. C. Rust. The common ingroup identity model: Recategorization and the reduction of intergroup bias. In W. Stroebe & M. Hewstone (Eds.), European Review of Social Psychology, 4 (1993), 1-26.

6. Witt, A. P., and N. L. Kerr. "Me versus just us versus us all": Categorization and cooperation in nested social dilemmas. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83 (2002), 616-637.

7. Accessed May 14, 2008, from www.gallup.com/poll/27124/Just-Why -Americans-Attend-Church.aspx

8. Based on several internal and external UUA surveys, including the Case-bolt survey (2001) and the FACT survey (2000). The Casebolt survey offered seven labels and allowed respondents to select as many as they felt applied to them. "Humanist was a clear choice (54 percent), but agnostic (33 percent) beat out earth-centered (31 percent). Atheist was picked by 18 percent and Buddhist by 16.5 percent. Pagan and Christian tied at 13.1 percent." The UUA's 1997 in-house survey asked members to choose only one label. "The top choices were humanist (46 percent), earth/ nature-centered (19 percent), theist (13 percent), [and] Christian (9.5 percent)." Quotes from Dart, John, "Churchgoers from Elsewhere," The Christian Century (December 5,2001).

9. Accessed May 14,2008, from www.aeu.org

10. Lee-St. John, Jeninne. "Sunday School for Atheists: An oxymoron? Nope— nonbelievers need places to teach their kids values too," TIME Magazine (December 3,2007), 99.

11. Accessed June 4, 2008, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girl_Scouts _of_the_USA

12. Accessed June 4,2008, from www.bsa-discrimination.org/html/gsusa.html

13. Accessed June 4,2008, from www.earthscouts.org

14. Accessed June 4,2008, from www.spiralscouts.org

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