About the Authors in Volume

MARC H. BORNSTEIN is Senior Investigator and Head of Child and Family Research at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He holds a B.A. from Columbia College and a Ph.D. from Yale University. Bornstein was a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow and received a RCDA from the NICHD, the Ford Cross-Cultural Research Award from the HRAF, the McCandless Young Scientist Award from the APA, the United States PHS Superior Service Award from the NIH, and the Arnold Gesell Prize from the Theodor Hellbriigge Foundation. Bornstein has held faculty positions at Princeton University and New York University as well as visiting academic appointments in Munich, London, Paris, New York, and Tokyo. Bornstein is Editor Emeritus of Child Development and Editor of Parenting: Science and Practice. He has contributed scientific papers in the areas of human experimental, methodological, comparative, developmental, cross-cultural, neuro-scientific, pediatric, and aesthetic psychology. Bornstein is coauthor of Development in Infancy (four editions) and general editor of The Crosscurrents in Contemporary Psychology Series (ten volumes) and the Monographs in Parenting (four volumes). He also edited the Handbook of Parenting (Vols. I-V, two editions), and he coedited Developmental Psychology: An Advanced Textbook (four editions) as well as a dozen other volumes. He is the author of several children's books and puzzles in The Child's World series.

DAVID M. BRODZINSKY is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Director of the Foster Care Counseling Project in the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University. He received his B.A. and Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Brodzinsky is past Vice-President of the Jean Piaget Society. His current research interests include the psychology of adoption and foster care, stress and coping in children, and divorce and child custody. He maintains a private practice in psychology, focusing on child and family therapy, as well as court-related evaluations associated with child custody, guardianship hearings, contested adoptions, and child abuse. Brodzinsky is the coauthor of Being Adopted: The Lifelong Search for Self and Children's Adjustment to Adoption: Developmental and Clinical Issues as well as coeditor of The Psychology of Adoption and Adoption and Prenatal Alcohol and Drug Exposure: Research, Policy, and Practice.

KIM B. BURGESS is an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Human Development, University of Maryland at College Park. Burgess received her Honors B.Sc. at the University of Victoria and Ph.D. from the University of Ottawa, Canada. She is on the Editorial Board of Child Development. Her research focuses on child psychological adjustment, peer relationships, and parent-child relationships.

W. ANDREW COLLINS is Rodney S. Wallace Professor for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning and Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. Collins has served as Director of the Institute of Child Development, as Secretary of the Society for Research in Child Development, and as President of the Society for Research on Adolescence. Collins's interests are in the study of social processes and relationships in middle childhood and adolescence, and he has investigated developmental aspects of children's and adolescents' responses to television and parent-child and peer relationships during the transitions to adolescence and to young adulthood. He served as chair of the National Research Council's Panel on the Status of Basic Research on Middle Childhood (ages 6-12 years) and was editor of Development During Middle Childhood: The Years from

Six to Twelve. Collins also coedited Relationships as Developmental Contexts.

BARBARA A. DIVITTO is a Psychologist at the Neurodevelopmental Center, North Shore Children's Hospital, Salem, Massachusetts. She received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College, M.A. from Tufts University, and Ph.D. from Brandeis University. She has worked at the Pediatric Rehabilitation Program, Jewish Memorial Hospital, Boston, and the Developmental Disabilities Unit of Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Boston, and has been co-director of education for the Boston Institute for the Development of Infants and Parents. DiVitto's interests include socioemotional development, parent education in high-risk groups, and mood disorders in children. She is coauthor of Born too Soon: Preterm Birth and Early Development.

CAROLYN POPE EDWARDS is Professor of Psychology and Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. She earned her doctorate in human development and bachelor's degree from Harvard University. She has been an invited Senior Fellow at the Norwegian Centre for Advanced Study in Oslo and Visiting Professor of psychology at the National Research Council in Rome and has held faculty positions at the University of Kentucky, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and Vassar College. Edwards' interests center on social and moral development in cultural context and socialization processes within the family and childcare and educational settings. Her books include Promoting Social and Moral Development of Young Children; Creative Ideas for the Classroom; and Children of Different Worlds: The Formation ofSocial Behavior, along with the edited works, Bambini: The Italian Approach to Infant-Toddler Care and The Hundred

Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Approach to Early Childhood Education.

DAVID J. EGGEBEEN is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Senior Research Associate, Population Research Institute at the Pennsylvania State University. He received his B.A. from Calvin College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His research interests include the changing social demography of childhood, intergenerational support over the life course, and fatherhood.

WYNDOL FURMAN is a Professor and Director of Clinical Training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Denver. He received a B.A. from Duke University, an M.A. from George Peabody College, and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He was a W. T. Grant Faculty Scholar and received the Provost's Award and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the University of Denver. His research interests have focused on children and adolescents' close relationships, including relationships with siblings, parents, friends, and romantic partners. Furman coedited The Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence.

SUSAN GOLDBERG is a Research Scientist in the Research Institute at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Toronto. She completed her undergraduate work at Antioch College (A.B.), her graduate studies at Tufts University (M.S.) and University of

Massachusetts (Ph.D.), and taught at Brandéis University. Her research focuses on early parent-child relationships and how they are influenced by early diagnosed medical problems. She is coauthor of Born too Soon:

Preterm Birth and Early Development and author of Attachment and Development.

JEFFREY HAUGAARD is Associate Professor of Human Development and Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow at Cornell University. He received his B.A. from the University of California at Santa Cruz, an M.A. from Santa Clara University, and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. He was the Founding President of the Section on Child Maltreatment of the Division of Child, Youth, and Family Services of the American Psychological Association. He is an associate editor of Law and Human Behavior and is on the editorial boards of Child Maltreatment and Adoption Quarterly. He was a foster father for a boy who came from Viet Nam and continues in his expanded role of foster father, foster father-in-law, and foster grandfather. Haugaard is the author of Problematic Behaviors During Adolescence and The Sexual Abuse of Children.

CINDY HAZAN is Associate Professor in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University. She received her education (B.A., M.A., and Ph.D.) at the University of Denver. She is a member of the American Psychological Society, International Society for the Study of Personal Relationships, the New York Academy of Sciences, is on the editorial board for Personal Relationships, and is a consulting editor for Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Her research interests include processes of attachment formation, pair bonding, and evolutionary models of human mating.

ROBERT M. HODAPP is Professor in the Department of Education, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, at the University of California, Los Angeles. Hodapp received his B.A. from Columbia College and Ph.D. from Boston University. His research interests concern developmental issues in children with mental retardation and the development of and parental reactions toward children with different genetic syndromes of mental retardation. He is on the editorial boards of the American Journal on Mental Retardation, Mental Retardation, and Early Education and Development. Hodapp is the author of Development and Disabilities and coauthor of Genetics and Mental Retardation Syndromes, and he coedited Issues in the Developmental

Approach to Mental Retardation and the Handbook of Mental Retardation and Development.

RICHARD P. LANTHIER is Assistant Professor of Human Development at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Denver and previously held an appointment at Texas Tech University. Lanthier's current research interests revolve around social relationships and personality across the lifespan.

CAMPBELL LEAPER is Professor in the Department of Psychology and Associate Dean of Social Sciences at the University of California at Santa Cruz. He was educated at Boston University (B.A.) and UCLA (Ph.D.). Leaper was a NIMH research fellow at Harvard Medical School. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, the Society for Research in Child Development, the Society for Research on Adolescence, the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, the International Society for the Study of Personal Relationships, and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. He is currently on the editorial board of Developmental Psychology and Sex Roles. His research focuses on the origins and consequences of gender inequities across the lifespan, how gender is defined and maintained, and contextual influences on gender development. Leaper edited Childhood Gender Segregation: Causes and Consequences.

WEN-LI LIU is in the interdisciplinary doctoral program in Human Resources and Family Sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She earned her bachelor's degree in biology from Beijing Teacher's College, her master's degree in education from Beijing Normal University, and her master's degree in family and consumer sciences from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her interests center on sex education and early childhood education, including parents' knowledge, attitudes, and practices around sex education for adolescents. Liu coauthored Sexual Behavior in Modern China—Report on the Nationwide Survey of20,000 Men and Women.

HUGH LYTTON is Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology, University of Calgary, Canada. Lytton received his training in school and clinical child psychology at the Tavistock Clinic, London, and his Ph.D. at the University of London, England. After service in the Armed Forces during World War II, his career spanned school teaching and professional (child clinical and school) psychology in England and Scotland. He then taught at the Universities of Exeter, England, and Calgary, Canada. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and of the Canadian Psychological Association. His research interests—mainly in the areas of developmental and educational psychology—have focused on bidirectional effects in parent-child relationships and on issues surrounding the origins of moral and antisocial behavior in genetic-biological substrates and in interactions within the family and the social environment. Lytton's books include Creativity and Education, Parent-Child Interaction: The Socialization Process Observed in Twin and Singleton Families, and Social Development: History, Theory and Research.

STEPHANIE D. MADSEN is a graduate student at the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. She received her B.A. from Carleton College and her M.A. from the University of Minnesota. Madsen is engaged in research on the parental influence on adolescent romantic relationships and the salience of adolescent romantic experiences for relationships in young adulthood.

ELLEN E. PINDERHUGHES is Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. She received her B.A. from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and her Ph.D. from Yale University. Her research focuses on child and family adjustment in special-needs adoptions, cultural and contextual influences on parenting, and prevention of conduct problems in adolescence.

SAMUEL P. PUTNAM is Assistant Professor at Bowdoin College. He received his B.S. from the University of Iowa and completed his Ph.D. at the Pennsylvania State University. He was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Oregon. His research interests include approach/withdrawal behavior in infants and young children, relations between emotional behavior and autonomic nervous system activity, and interactions between parenting and temperament in the development of normal and problem behaviors.

MARY K. ROTHBART is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Oregon and Senior Fellow at the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York. Her undergraduate work was completed at Reed College and her graduate studies at Stanford University. She is the current recipient of a Senior Scientist Award and MERIT Research Award from the National Institutes of Health. Her work on temperament has included the development of measures involving parent report (the Infant Behavior Questionnaire, Supplement to the Toddler Behavior Assessment Questionnaire, Children's Behavior Questionnaire) and self-report (the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire, Adult Temperament Questionnaire), standardized laboratory observations (the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery), and home observations. She studies the early development of attention in relation to temperamental self-regulation.

She has coedited Temperament in Childhood and is coauthor of Early Development of Attention: Themes and Variations.

KENNETH H. RUBIN is Director and Professor, Center for Children, Relationships, and Culture in the Department of Human Development, University of Maryland. He received his B.A. from McGill University, Canada, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University. Rubin is a Fellow of the Canadian and American Psychological Associations and has been a recipient of both a Killam Research Fellowship (Canada Council) and an Ontario Mental Health Senior Research Fellowship. He has been an Associate Editor of Child Development and is currently President of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development. Rubin's research interests include the study of children's peer and family relationships and their social and emotional development.

ANN V. SANSON is an Associate Professor in Psychology at the University of Melbourne and Principal Research Fellow at the Australian Institute of Family Studies. She completed a B.A. at the University of Western Australia and a Ph.D. at La Trobe University. She studies temperament in children from infancy to 18 years of age, and her research interests revolve around the interplay of intrinsic child characteristics and family and contextual factors in the development of good and poor psychosocial adjustment. She is a Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society and has held various positions in the Society, including Vice President and Director of Social Issues, and is a member of the Committee for the Psychological Study of Peace of the International Union of Psychological Science.

JENNIFER S. SILK is a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology in the Department of Psychology at Temple University. She received her B.A. from the University of Virginia and earned an M.A. from Temple University. Her research interests include the study of developmental psychopathology, affect regulation among children and adolescents, family interactions, and adolescent development.

LAURENCE STEINBERG is the Distinguished University Professor and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Psychology at Temple University. He taught previously at the University of California, Irvine, and at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. Steinberg was educated at Vassar College and at Cornell University, where he received his Ph.D. He is aFellow of the American Psychological Association and the immediate Past-President of the Society for Research on Adolescence. Steinberg is the author or coauthor of You and Your Adolescent: A Parent's Guide for Ages 10 to 20; Adolescence; When Teenagers Work: The Psychological and Social Costs of Adolescent Employment; Crossing Paths: How Your Child's Adolescence Triggers Your Own Crisis; Studying Minority Adolescents: Conceptual, Methodological, and Theoretical Issues; Beyond the Classroom; and Why School Reform Has Failed and What Parents Need to Do.

AMY SUSMAN-STILLMAN is Program Coordinator at the Irving B. Harris Training Center for Infant and Toddler Development at the University of Minnesota. She received her Ph.D. from the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Susman-Stillman is interested in understanding ecological influences on social and emotional development in early and middle childhood and in adolescence. Her interests also extend to the application of developmental science, particularly linking research findings with practice and public policy. Susman-Stillman has served on SRCD's Committee on Child Development, Public Policy and

Public Information and has engaged in policy education for the Children, Youth and Family Consortium at the University of Minnesota. She is currently serving on the editorial board of the Michigan State University Series on Children, Youth, and Families.

STEVEN H. ZARIT is Professor of Human Development and Assistant Director of the Gerontology Center at the Pennsylvania State University and Adjunct Professor, Institute of Gerontology, University College of Health Sciences in Jonkoping, Sweden. He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan, his A.M. from the University of Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Gerontological Society of America, former member and chair of the Committee on Aging of the APA, and a member of the National Advisory Board of the Alzheimer's Association. His research interests include stresses and interventions for family caregivers of older people and functional competency of the oldest-old population. He is coauthor of Mental Disorders in Older Adults: Principles of Assessment and Treatment.

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