Diagnosis

It really helps if you write your answers to the questions below in your Attitude Makeover Journal.

What. What does your kid specifically do that you consider impolite? Interrupt? Belch? Forget to say "thank you"? Use the wrong eating utensils? Or are you talking about a more vulgar behavior? Does he swear at you? Slam the door in your face? Use her cell phone in the middle of your family dinner? Over the next week, take a serious look at your kid's ill-mannered ways. Jot down a few rude behaviors that specifically concern you. (A list of proper etiquette is provided in the next section.You might refer to it as you diagnose your kid's attitude problem.)

Why. Why does your kid have this attitude? Are manners modeled in your home? Is he hanging around peers or adults who are impolite? Is he watching or listening to CDs, movies, or TV shows that flaunt rudeness or even vulgarity? Is he allowed to get away with this attitude? Does he somehow think it's cool to be rude? Is he treated in a discourteous manner? Has he in the past? Where has he learned this attitude?

Who. Does he display the same rude attitude to everyone? Are there some individuals he does not use this attitude on? If so, who? Why not? Could it have anything to do with the way they are responding to him?

When. Is there a particular time of day, week, or month he is more impolite? Is there a reason? For instance, might he be with a particular group of kids? Watching a TV show? Spending time with an adult who models rudeness?

Where. Are there certain places he is more likely to be impolite (at a certain friend's house, in public, at the movies, at school or day care, at the dinner table, at a restaurant, at the store, at Grandma's)? Why?

Now take a look at your answers.Are you seeing any predictable patterns? Is your kid using this attitude only in certain places or only with certain people? Do you have any better understanding of this attitude and where it's coming from? Write down your thoughts.

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Confident Kids

Confident Kids

Although nobody gets a parenting manual or bible in the delivery room, it is our duty as parents to try to make our kids as well rounded, happy and confident as possible. It is a lot easier to bring up great kids than it is to try and fix problems caused by bad parenting, when our kids have become adults. Our children are all individuals - they are not our property but people in their own right.

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